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Absorbable Sutures

Absorbable sutures at CIA Medical with great prices and fast shipping

Hospitals, ERs and medical offices all use sutures to repair lacerations and incisions. Some types of sutures absorb into the skin during the healing process, eliminating the need for later removal. Find out more about absorbable sutures and absorbable suture sizes below.

What is an Absorbable Suture?

An absorbable suture dissolves as a wound heals. By the second or third week of healing, the tensile strength of an absorbable suture begins breaking down. Within three months, the skin has completely absorbed the stitches.

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How Does an Absorbable Suture Work?

Physicians typically stitch internal wounds with an absorbable suture, and then use a non-absorbable suture for exterior applications. When the absorbable sutures are internal, the patient’s immune system acts against what it perceives as a threat. The enzymes that naturally occur in the tissues break down the fibers of absorbable sutures. Many types of absorbable sutures are quite strong at first, but they degrade quickly along a similar time frame as the healing process.

Absorbable Suture Types

Absorbable sutures can be monofilament or a braided multifilament material. They can be made from natural fiber or synthetics. The four most common absorbable suture types are as follows:

  • Gut – Gut sutures come from natural materials and are single-stranded. Their most common use is in gynecological surgery such as Caesarean sections.
  • Poliglecaprone (MONOCRYL) – Poliglecaprone sutures are single synthetic filaments. Surgeons mainly use these types of absorbable suture for repairing soft tissues and minimizing scarring.
  • Polyglactin (Vicryl) – A braided multifilament material made from synthetics, the polyglactin absorbable suture is a frequent choice for hand or facial repairs.
  • Polydioxanone (PDS) – Monofilament PDS sutures are made from polydioxanone, a synthetic material. These types of absorbable suture are frequently used in abdominal surgery and pediatric cardiac surgery.

Absorbable Suture Sizes

The United States Pharmacopoeia designates suture sizes according to the diameter of the strand. For example, a size 5 USP synthetic absorbable suture is 0.7 millimeters in diameter. At the other end of the scale, a size 10-0 USP is 0.02 mm in diameter, so the smaller, single digit sizes of absorbable sutures are the largest in diameter.

The most common absorbable suture sizes and their uses include:

  • Sizes 3-0 to 4-0, 0.2 mm and 0.15 – general repair
  • Sizes 5-0 to 6-0, 0.1 mm and 0.07 mm – facial repair

Non-absorbable Sutures

Non-absorbable sutures do not degrade, so patients must return to their healthcare providers to have these stitches removed. They are made from natural materials like silk and synthetics like polyester, nylon and polypropylene. Sometimes, physicians even use wire sutures when the job calls for extra strength, such as some types of orthopedic surgery.

Absorbable Suture Suppliers

When you need absorbable suture suppliers with the material, size and price options your practice needs, look no further than CIA Medical. With over 5,000 brands and 500,000 products in our catalog, you won’t find a better selection anywhere.

CIA Medical Stocks Absorbable Sutures With Great Bulk Pricing for Medical Pros

We offer extensive options in brands, types and sizes of medical supplies, and if you don’t see what you need in our online catalog, get in touch and we help you find it. We provide quick quotes and white-glove service too. Create your CIA Medical account today, or call us at (312) 275-5850 for more information.

When the sutures are internal, the patient’s immune system acts against what it perceives as a threat. The enzymes that naturally occur in the tissues break down the fibers of absorbable sutures. Many types of absorbable sutures are quite strong at first, but they degrade quickly along a similar time frame as the healing process.